(April 5) – The House gave final approval today to a school safety bill that will save the lives of students suffering from severe allergic reactions. The vote was 53-10.

HB13-1171, sponsored by Rep. Dianne Primavera (D-Broomfield), allows, but does not require, schools to authorize the school nurse or other qualified personnel to give an epinephrine auto-injector to a student who is believed to be experiencing anaphylactic shock, regardless of whether the student has a prescription.

Anaphylaxis is an intense allergic reaction that can be triggered in a matter of seconds by such things as bee stings or ingestion of medications or foods. Unless treated promptly, it can be life-threatening. But under current law, schools don’t have the authority to administer the customary treatment, epinephrine, unless a prescription is already on file.

“Young students may not know that they’re highly allergic to a bee sting or a certain type of food until the first time they get stung, or eat the food,” Rep. Primavera said. “If that first event happens in school, the paramedics might not arrive in time. This bill makes our kids safer.”

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